Safety Alerts
On a late fall morning in the Northeast, a flatbed truck delivering logging equipment to a site had stopped at the beginning of an icy logging road to put tire chains on. 
Two loaded log trucks from the same logging company were loaded with treelength pulpwood that had overhanging logs. The two drivers were taking their load to the same mill in the southern U.S., so they traveled together. The weather was clear and sunny. This was their first load of the day.
On a summer afternoon in the southern U.S., a forest technician had finished painting a streamside management zone line and walked back to his pickup truck. It was a hot, humid day with a heat index reaching 106 degrees by mid- to late afternoon.
On a summer morning in the south, a landowning company employee was riding down a company woods road on an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) and passing through an area that had been used as a loading deck.
On a cold and windy spring morning in the Northeast, a log procurement manager and a log buyer were on the woodyard talking about moving to a different pile of logs to be scaled.
On a cool, clear, early spring morning, three logging business employees were riding in a company-owned crew truck to their jobsite in the southeastern U.S. It was midweek, but the crew had not worked the day before.
At the end of a late fall workday in the eastern U.S., a driver was backing his tractor and empty log trailer into his driveway off a rural two-lane road. It was clear, dry, and dark outside.
The buncher operator was 25 years old and had been with this employer for over 2 years. He had completed this task many times before and was considered fully trained to perform the replacement. He wore all the required personal protective equipment.
The mechanic was in his early 50’s and had been a mechanic for over 13 years. He worked for this employer for 2 months prior to the incident. He was experienced in the task at hand, and he was wearing a hard hat, safety glasses, high-visibility vest, and steel-toed boots.
At the beginning of a work shift on a summer morning in the Appalachians, a logging business owner and a co-worker were removing a stick that had lodged between the feller-buncher window and the window guard.
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